climate change

In Hot Water

Warming ocean waters are one of many climate change consequences, and scientists have observed fish migrating to stay within their preferred temperature range. Janet Nye, a UNC-Chapel Hill marine scientist, wants to understand how a warmer environment will affect these animals to help fisheries better prepare for the future.

Unearthing the Planet’s History

About 2 billion years ago, the oceans were green, the land red and rocky, and only 1 percent of Earth’s atmosphere was oxygen. How did the planet become what it is today? UNC geochemist Xiao-Ming Liu collects samples of soil, rocks, and water from places like Hawaii to find the answer.

Restoring Rural China

While the United States and China take up roughly the same amount of land mass, China’s population is over four times that of the U.S. — and more people means more change in vegetation growth. How do these factors connect to climate change? Conghe Song explores this relationship, pursuing a project that has led to his return to his birthplace: rural China.

In Your Backyard

Allison Duprey and Andrew Zachman experience new opportunities through hands-on fieldwork — right here, on UNC’s campus.

Erika Wise

Erika Wise is an associate professor of geography in the UNC College of Arts & Sciences, head of the Climate & Tree Ring Environmental Science research group, and an affiliate faculty member within the Institute for the Environment. Her research focuses on tree ring patterns and deciphering what they tell us about climate change.